Halal Meat: Permissible, or Forbidden?

A halal butcher shop in France

A halal butcher shop in France

If you find yourself wandering around certain parts of Paris, you’ll start to see various butchers and restaurants with the word “halal” attached to their name. Unlike kebabs, the politics of which I discussed in my last post, halal meat does have a direct relationship to and implication of Islam. The term “halal” means “permissible” or “allowed,” and refers to meat that is prepared in a specific way (for example, killed by hand and blessed), and without contact to other “forbidden” meats or cuts (such as pork, or hindquarters). Of course it is a bit more complicated than that – the Halal Wikipedia page has a more thorough definition – but for our purposes, it is enough to simply understand the essential relationship between halal meat and religion.

As with kebabs, there has been controversy over halal meat in France – perhaps even more so. In 2012, then-president Nicolas Sarkozy and far-right Front National leader Marine Le Pen both spoke out in favor of Continue reading

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The State of Fromage

Traditional French Cheese Board

Traditional French Cheese Board

French cheeses are going extinct.

In a literal sense, this dramatic statement holds some truth – raw-milk “traditional” cheese varieties, characterized by specific sets of bacteria, are dying out due to regulatory mechanisms, consumer disinterest, and a shifting agricultural model. French culinary authorities hold unpasteurized or raw milk-based cheese in high regard, even as a defining tenet of French national identity. But realistically, traditional unpasteurized French cheese may not survive in an increasingly standardized and industrialized global dairy industry.

In 1998, 18% of French cheese production was unpasteurized. In 2010, only 7% remained unpasteurized. So what happened in those sixteen years? Apparently, a lot: Continue reading