“French-ifying” the No-Go Zones

Over 3 million people across France gathered to march in tribute to the victims of the January 2015 terrorist attacks

Over 3 million people across France gathered to march in tribute to the victims of the January 2015 terrorist attacks

The recent events in Paris surrounding the Charlie Hebdo attacks have sparked a series of intense conversations about immigration, integration, tolerance, religion, and free speech in France. These conversations range from constructive and thought-provoking to ignorant and downright offensive. One such “controversial” voice in the conversation is Fox News, which infamously issued a report denoting “no-go zones,” neighborhoods in Paris characterized by a heavy concentration of Muslim residents.

Nolan Peterson on the "no-go zones," Fox News

Nolan Peterson reporting for Fox News on the supposed “no-go zones” in Paris

While this report in and of itself was offensive, inaccurate, and short-sighted, the responses to it sparked a different sentiment. Parisians were quick to defend their neighborhoods, and in doing so looked to assert the “safeness” of these no-go zones by proving just how French they are. One such rebuttal was taken up by popular food blog, Continue reading

The Other Fast Food: Kebabs

Doner Kebab

Typical Doner Kebab (Wikimedia Commons)

Before fast food, there was street food.

One of the most prolific street food items throughout the Middle East is the kebab, a flatbread sandwich filled with meat sliced from a rotating spit. If you’ve been to Europe since 1990 (and perhaps found yourself out at a late hour with one too many drinks in your system) you are probably familiar with the kebab, sold from tiny shops stuck in between electronics stores and Laundromats, displaying that golden tower of slowly rotating mystery meat prominently in the front window.

I have grown to love the Parisian Kebab, the majority of which are Turkish and come with a generous pile of frites stuffed into the center and smothered in a mayonnaise-based white sauce, modifications that have acted as a sort of “hybridization” to appeal to French customers. Like pizza and now the hamburger, kebabs have grown in popularity and shops have grown in number as globalization intensifies the flow of cultures, people, and objects throughout the world. But unlike pizza or hamburgers, both of which have Continue reading